Staff

InZone staff include highly experienced trainers from our MAS faculty roster and graduates of the MAS course with field experience. First-hand knowledge of the field is indeed the distinguishing feature of the InZone project: all of our collaborators have worked in the field and are thus familiar with the special needs of humanitarian workers in general and humanitarian interpreters in particular. All InZone faculty donate their services to InZone.

Current members (in alphabetical order) are:

 

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Grégoire Bali

Grégoire Salim Bali was born in 1979 in Aleppo, Syria. He received a BA in Translation from the Lebanese University in Beirut, and a Diplôme d’Interprète de conférence from the University of Geneva.

After graduating from ETI (now FTI) with a MA in Conference Interpreting in 2006, he became an accredited freelance conference interpreter at the United Nations Office in Geneva, and has since been working for Geneva-based UN agencies as well as EU institutions and many IGOs and NGOs in Europe and around the globe.

Between 2007 and 2010 he was research assistant at FTI working on a project called “Interpreting in Zones of Crisis and War: Improving Multilingual Communication”, in collaboration with the ICRC, which resulted in the development and implementation of the online training modules for ICRC field interpreters in 2008 and 2009.

He has co-authored several published articles and presented his research at several scientific conferences. 

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Prisca Chaoui

A staff interpreter at the United Nations Office in Geneva since 2005, Prisca Chaoui holds a Degree in Interpretation (FTI, University of Geneva), a DEA in Translation Studies (ESIT, Sorbonne-Nouvelle), a Master's Degree in International Relations (Université Pierre-Mendès France, Grenoble) and a degree in Modern Languages (ETIB, Université Saint-Joseph, Beyrouth). Before joining the UN in Geneva, she worked as both a translator and interpreter for international organizations including UNESCO, WIPO, the ILO, and the WMO. She has taught at the FTI since 2007, and was Professor Barbara Moser-Mercer's assistant from 2002 to 2004. In collaboration with Barbara Moser-Mercer, she served as a trainer for the students in the UNHCR VII course.

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Carmen Delgado Luchner

Post-doctoral researcher

Carmen Delgado Luchner is a trained translator and conference interpreter. She has been accredited with the EU institutions since 2008 and holds an MAS in interpreter training and a PhD in interpreting. After working for InZone for three years as doctoral assistant, Carmen became a post-doctoral researcher in January 2016. As part of her involvement with InZone, she has participated in multiple on-site and on-line training courses for interpreters working for UNHCR, ICRC and other organisations. 

From 1 February 2017 to 31 July 2018, Carmen will be on scientific leave with an Early Postdoc.Mobility scholarship from the Swiss National Science Foundation. Together with the research teams of Prof. Hilary Footitt (University of Reading, UK) and Prof. Kobus Marais (University of the Free State, RSA), she will be analysing the role of language brokers in development projects.

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Josh Goldsmith

Doctoral Assistant

Josh Goldsmith holds a BA in Linguistics from Princeton University, an MA in the Teaching of Languages and Literatures from the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and an MA in Conference Interpreting from the University of Geneva. He has worked as a language teacher, teacher trainer, translator and interpreter on three different continents.

Josh joined InZone in early 2015, serving as the Coordinator of the Geneva Summer Schools Program on Higher Education in Emergencies. He is currently pursuing a PhD at the University of Geneva, where his research interests lie at the intersection between communication, education, and technology.

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Erin Hayba

Doctoral Assistant

Erin Hayba is currently pursuing her PhD at the University of Geneva, where her research examines higher education programs for refugees in conflict and crisis zones.

Until 2014, Erin worked with UNHCR as an education coordinator and officer with Syrian refugees in Lebanon and at Dadaab Refugee Camp in Kenya. She received a UNHCR Innovation Fellowship for her work adapting technology to promote learning in emergency contexts.

Erin has also worked for the Earth Institute at Columbia University on an initiative promoting secondary education in Africa, as a fellow at Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission in the U.S. Congress, and as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Kenya, teaching at a school for Deaf children. Erin is a graduate of Harvard University, and holds an Ed.M. in International Education Policy and a B.S. from Penn State University.

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Marta Lumbreras Areta

Marta Lumbreras Areta was born in Madrid, Spain, in 1982. She obtained her degree in Translation and Interpreting from the Universidad Pontificia Comillas of Madrid in 2004. She then came to Geneva and worked at the Permanent Mission of Spain to the United Nations as a junior human rights expert (2004-2005). She went on to graduate with an MA in Conference Interpreting from the University of Geneva's Ecole de Traduction et d'Interprétation (ETI) in 2007. Since then, she has worked as a freelance interpreter on both the UN and private market.

Between 2008 and 2012 she was a research and teaching assistant at ETI, where she completed a Master of Advanced Studies in Interpreter Training (2008-2010). She is currently completing a degree in law at a Spanish distance learning university.

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Kerstin Mercer

Applied Arts Instructor

Kerstin Mercer works as an international storyteller, educator and coffee consultant. Based in London, she most frequently finds herself in Geneva and across Africa. Educated at Northwestern and the University of London in Communications and Applied Theatre, Kerstin’s subsequent work has ranged from performance to education to business, with the common thread of bridging cultures through creative communications. She has been teaching interpreters to reconnect with their ‘right to speak’ through voice workshops since 2005, as well as exploring the virtual use of the Applied Arts in training field interpreters in a humanitarian context (with InZone) since 2009. As of 2014, Kerstin has brought it from the virtual back to the face-to-face in Kakuma, delivering the Applied Arts component of InZone’s Higher Education Spaces initiative.

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Barbara Moser-Mercer

Full Professor - Director of InZone

Barbara Moser-Mercer is Professor of conference interpreting and founder and Director of InZone, University of Geneva. Her research focuses on cognitive and cognitive neuro-science aspects of the interpreting process and on the human performance dimension of skill development and expertise, and on pedagogical approaches to digital learning in fragile contexts. She has co-developed the Virtualinstitute©, a virtual learning environment specifically designed for the acquisition of complex skills, which she has been leveraging in partnership with ICRC, ILO, UNHCR, and UNAMA for enhancing interpreting skills of interpreters working in conflict zones and to advance formal and non-formal higher education in emergencies (HEiE).  She was a member of the European Union's High Level Group on Multilingualism, coordinated the European Masters in Conference Interpreting, funded by the European Parliament and the European Commission. She is also an active conference interpreter and member of AIIC.

Research Interests

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Ian Newton

Chief Interpreter, ILO

Having trained as an interpreter and exercised that profession as a free-lance and staff-member within the European and United Nations organizations, Ian Newton subsequently became a manager in conference and documentation services. He teaches conference interpretation at the University of Geneva and has also been an active participant in the UN-sponsored International Annual Meeting on Language Arrangements, Documentation and Publications (IAMLADP), as a member of the Task Force on the Status of the Language Professions, the Task Force on e-Learning, the University Contacts Group, as well as the Task Force on Interpretation Services. He is a member of the Association internationale des Interprètes de Conférence (AIIC).

Current activities:

  • Chief Interpreter, International Labour Office (ILO), Geneva.
  • Chargé d'enseignement, University of Geneva (Coordinator of: General Consecutive Master Classes, Pedagogical Group)

Past activities:

  • Deputy Chief, Document and Publications Production, Printing and Distribution Branch, ILO
  • Head, Official Correspondence and Organization of Meetings Section, ILO
  • Staff Interpreter, ILO
  • Free-lance interpreter, based in Brussels and Geneva
  • Staff Interpreter, European Commission, Brussels

Ian Newton holds an MA in Modern and Mediaeval Languages from the University of Cambridge, Christ's College and trained as an internee in conference interpretation at the European Commission.

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Tobias Wehrli

Webmaster

Tobias received his Master's Degree from the University of Geneva's Faculty of Translation and Interpreting. From 2008 to 2012, he worked as a Research and Teaching Assistant for the Department of Translation Technology (TIM), where he taught courses in Computer Assisted Translation and Localization. Tobias is also the coordinator of Suissetra, the Swiss association for CAT-tool-promotion.

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Nayla Younes

Nayla Younes Chebli is a UN-accredited conference interpreter (AIIC member, AR-EN-FR), working in both conference and field interpreting.

She holds an MA of Advanced Studies in Interpreter Training from FTI-Geneva, an MA in Conference Interpreting from Saint Joseph University-Beirut, and an MA in Translation Studies from Caen University-France.

She is an instructor of conference interpreting at the Lebanese University, Centre for Languages and Translation (CLT), and was Head of the CLT's Interpretation Department between 2007 and 2013.

Her work as a field interpreter in conflict and post-conflict settings in the Middle-East made her aware of the shortcomings in training conference interpreters, whom traditional training curricula do not prepare to face the ethical and emotional dilemmas posed by field interpreting.